Elkhorn Ranch Stage

Located in the “Dance Studio” up on the main level.  This stage will be hosting “invited performers” with a full venue of western music and cowboy poetry.

Check back later for a stage schedule.

Elkhorn Ranch

Cache Valley’s first white settlers were cowboys, sent here to build a cattle ranch. Lured by the rich, verdant valley, some 3,000 head of cattle—most belonging to the Mormon Church—were driven through Sardine Canyon in the summer of 1855. Ranch headquarters was established not far from here, near the west side of the Blacksmith Fork River, a set of antlers hung over the main gate, and the place christened Elkhorn Ranch.

All went well through summer and fall as cattle grew fat and corrals and cabins were built. But the reality of Cache Valley winters caught up with the enterprise. Snow started falling in November and piled up to depths over four feet in the valley and ten feet in Sardine Canyon. With feed buried under the snow and little hay stacked, the cattle soon suffered.

After rounding up the herd, the strongest of the cattle were driven out of the Valley in search of better feed. A few cattle and cowboys wintered over at Elkhorn Ranch, and all nearly perished from hunger. Willows cut by the men saved a few of the animals, and sage hens driven out of the hills by cold and storm, along with seed peas and wheat, saved the cowboys from starvation. Even rescue crews nearly died in attempts to bring in supplies.

The cattle driven to the low country did  not fare well either, and, come spring, only 420 head of the thousands driven to Cache Valley the summer before survived.